Learning Gongyo 6 Rounds

8 April 2020

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Learning Gongyo 6 Rounds

Learning Gongyo 6 Rounds

Learning Gongyo 6 Rounds

Learning Gongyo and performing it through six rounds can be a fulfilling practice, often associated with Nichiren Buddhism. Gongyo is a form of liturgical service and involves the recitation of parts of the Lotus Sutra, followed by chanting the daimoku, which is Nam-myoho-renge-kyo, a phrase that encapsulates the essence of the Lotus Sutra’s teachings. Here’s a simplified guide to get you started with the Gongyo practice and how to approach the six rounds of recitation and chanting.

Introduction to Gongyo

Gongyo literally translates to “assiduous practice” and is a fundamental ritual in Nichiren Buddhism, focusing on the recitation of specific chapters from the Lotus Sutra—a key text in this Buddhist tradition—and chanting the daimoku.

Learning Gongyo Introduction and 6 Rounds Basic Structure of Gongyo

Gongyo practices can vary slightly depending on the school of Nichiren Buddhism, but they generally include the following components:

  1. Opening: Start with the preparation of your altar, if you have one, by offering fresh water and perhaps lighting a candle or incense.

  2. Bell Ringing: If you have a small bell, it’s traditionally used at certain points during Gongyo to signify transitions in the practice.

  3. Recitation of the Lotus Sutra: Typically, Gongyo involves the recitation of excerpts from the 2nd chapter “Hoben-pon” and the 16th chapter “Juryo-hon” of the Lotus Sutra. These are recited in the language of the original translation (often Classical Chinese or Japanese), but translations are available for understanding.

  4. Daimoku Chanting: After reciting the Lotus Sutra passages, you chant Nam-myoho-renge-kyo repeatedly. This is the core practice and is believed to enable practitioners to tap into their innate Buddhahood.

  5. Closing: Conclude your practice with a silent prayer of gratitude and dedication of merits for the happiness and enlightenment of all beings.

Six Rounds of Gongyo

A “round” of Gongyo typically refers to the combination of sutra recitation and daimoku chanting. Doing multiple rounds can deepen your practice, but it’s essential to maintain mindfulness and respect for the ritual throughout. Here’s a simplified approach for six rounds:

  1. First Round: Perform a complete Gongyo with both recitations and then chant daimoku for at least five minutes.
  2. Second to Fifth Rounds: These can be shorter, focusing more on daimoku chanting. Some practitioners choose to only recite the second chapter “Hoben-pon” during these middle rounds.
  3. Sixth Round: Conclude with a full Gongyo, reciting both the second and sixteenth chapters, followed by a longer period of daimoku chanting to seal the practice.

Tips for Practice

  • Consistency: Try to make Gongyo a daily practice, even if the duration is short. Consistency is more important than length.
  • Mindfulness: Focus on the meaning of the words and the chant. Understanding the sutra’s teachings can enrich your practice.
  • Posture and Breathing: Maintain a comfortable and upright posture. Breathe naturally and focus on the rhythm of the chant.

Learning Resources

  • Books and Guides: Look for guides published by your specific Nichiren Buddhist organization. They often contain the exact text for Gongyo, explanations of the meanings, and practical tips.
  • Online Videos and Recordings: These can be excellent for learning pronunciation and rhythm, especially for the sutra recitations.
  • Community: Joining a local or online practice group can provide support, motivation, and deeper insights into the practice.

Remember, the journey of Gongyo is personal and spiritual. It’s more about the sincerity of your practice than perfecting the form. As you grow in your practice, you’ll likely discover a deeper sense of clarity, purpose, and connection.

Learning Gongyo and performing it through Learning Gongyo Introduction and 6 RoundsLearning Gongyo Introduction and 6 Roundssix rounds can be a fulfilling practice, often associated with Nichiren Buddhism. Gongyo is a form of liturgical service and involves the recitation of parts of the Lotus Sutra, followed by chanting the daimoku, which is Nam-myoho-renge-kyo, a phrase that encapsulates the essence of the Lotus Sutra’s teachings. Here’s a simplified guide to get you started with the Gongyo practice and how to approach the six rounds of recitation and chanting.

Introduction to Gongyo

Gongyo literally translates to “assiduous practice” and is a fundamental ritual in Nichiren Buddhism, focusing on the recitation of specific chapters from the Lotus Sutra—a key text in this Buddhist tradition—and chanting the daimoku.

Basic Structure of Gongyo

Gongyo practices can vary slightly depending on the school of Nichiren Buddhism, but they generally include the following components:

  1. Opening: Start with the preparation of your altar, if you have one, by offering fresh water and perhaps lighting a candle or incense.

  2. Bell Ringing: If you have a small bell, it’s traditionally used at certain points during Gongyo to signify transitions in the practice.

  3. Recitation of the Lotus Sutra: Typically, Gongyo involves the recitation of excerpts from the 2nd chapter “Hoben-pon” and the 16th chapter “Juryo-hon” of the Lotus Sutra. These are recited in the language of the original translation (often Classical Chinese or Japanese), but translations are available for understanding.

  4. Daimoku Chanting: After reciting the Lotus Sutra passages, you chant Nam-myoho-renge-kyo repeatedly. This is the core practice and is believed to enable practitioners to tap into their innate Buddhahood.

  5. Closing: Conclude your practice with a silent prayer of gratitude and dedication of merits for the happiness and enlightenment of all beings.

Six Rounds of Gongyo

A “round” of Gongyo typically refers to the combination of sutra recitation and daimoku chanting. Doing multiple rounds can deepen your practice, but it’s essential to maintain mindfulness and respect for the ritual throughout. Here’s a simplified approach for six rounds:

  1. First Round: Perform a complete Gongyo with both recitations and then chant daimoku for at least five minutes.
  2. Second to Fifth Rounds: These can be shorter, focusing more on daimoku chanting. Some practitioners choose to only recite the second chapter “Hoben-pon” during these middle rounds.
  3. Sixth Round: Conclude with a full Gongyo, reciting both the second and sixteenth chapters, followed by a longer period of daimoku chanting to seal the practice.

Tips for Practice

  • Consistency: Try to make Gongyo a daily practice, even if the duration is short. Consistency is more important than length.
  • Mindfulness: Focus on the meaning of the words and the chant. Understanding the sutra’s teachings can enrich your practice.
  • Posture and Breathing: Maintain a comfortable and upright posture. Breathe naturally and focus on the rhythm of the chant.

Learning Resources

  • Books and Guides: Look for guides published by your specific Nichiren Buddhist organization. They often contain the exact text for Gongyo, explanations of the meanings, and practical tips.
  • Online Videos and Recordings: These can be excellent for learning pronunciation and rhythm, especially for the sutra recitations.
  • Community: Joining a local or online practice group can provide support, motivation, and deeper insights into the practice.

Remember, the journey of Gongyo is personal and spiritual. It’s more about the sincerity of your practice than perfecting the form. As you grow in your practice, you’ll likely discover a deeper sense of clarity, purpose, and connection.

 
 
 
 
 
 

Learning Gongyo Introduction and 6 Rounds

Learning Gongyo 6 Rounds Introduction

Learning Gongyo 6 Rounds Round 1: Pronunciation

Learning Gongyo 6 Rounds Round 2: Rhythm

Learning Gongyo 6 Rounds Round 3: The Challenge

Round 4: Slow Gongyo

Round 5: Medium Speed Gongyo

Learning Gongyo 6 Rounds Round 6: Ideal Speed Gongyo

Learning Gongyo 6 Rounds Daimoku – Nam myoho renge kyo – 15 minutes

Learning Gongyo 6 Rounds Gongyo & Daimoku Morning (lyrics)

Learning Gongyo 6 Rounds Nam Myoho Renge Kyo – Ten Minute Daimoku – Chanting – 南無妙法蓮華経 – Namu Myōhō Renge Kyō

Learning Gongyo 6 Rounds Nichiren Buddhism ‘Evening Gongyo’ Moderate Speed

Learning Gongyo 6 Rounds Nam Myoho Renge Kyo Chant 108 Times

https://www.reciprocalinfluence.com/category/guide/

Learning Gongyo 6 Rounds

 

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